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Supplementation with lutein or lutein plus green tea extracts does not change oxidative stress in adequately nourished older adults

Supplementation with lutein or lutein plus green tea extracts does not change oxidative stress in adequately nourished older adults

Author: Lei Li and C.-Y. Oliver Chen and Giancarlo Aldini and Elizabeth J. Johnson and Helen Rasmussen and Yasukazu Yoshida and Etsuo Niki and Jeffrey B. Blumberg and Robert M. Russell and Kyung-Jin Yeum

Epigallocatechin gallate, a major component of green tea polyphenols, protects against the oxidation of fat-soluble antioxidants including lutein. The current study determined the effect of a relatively high but a dietary achievable dose of lutein or lutein plus green tea extract on antioxidant status. Healthy subjects (50–70 years) were randomly assigned to one of two groups (n=20 in each group): (1) a lutein (12 mg/day) supplemented group or (2) a lutein (12 mg/day) plus green tea extract (200 mg/day) supplemented group. After 2 weeks of run-in period consuming less than two servings of lightly colored fruits and vegetables in their diet, each group was treated for 112 days while on their customary regular diets. Plasma carotenoids including lutein, tocopherols, flavanols and ascorbic acid were analyzed by HPLC-UVD and HPLC-electrochemical detector systems; total antioxidant capacity by fluorometry; lipid peroxidation by malondialdehyde using a HPLC system with a fluorescent detector and by total hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids using a GC/MS. Plasma lutein, total carotenoids and ascorbic acid concentrations of subjects in either the lutein group or the lutein plus green tea extract group were significantly increased (P<.05) at 4 weeks and throughout the 16-week study period. However, no significant changes from baseline in any biomarker of overall antioxidant activity or lipid peroxidation of the subjects were seen in either group. Our results indicate that an increase of antioxidant concentrations within a range that could readily be achieved in a healthful diet does not affect in vivo antioxidant status in normal healthy subjects when sufficient amounts of antioxidants already exist.

 

 

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