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Swirling Matcha — What the Traditionalists Are Missing

By Eric Gower Jul 17, 2015

Swirling Matcha — What the Traditionalists Are Missing

Swirling matcha makes it taste a lot better.

This observation is a lovely discovery, and it’s a genuine addition to the venerable history of matcha.

Matcha isn’t swirled in the traditional method — it’s whipped up in the bowl and consumed. No swirling.

But swirling releases all kinds of wonderfulness.

Just as swirling a glass of wine makes it taste better — every sommelier knows this — it’s the same with matcha. Swirling — or what physicists call “orbital shaking” — actually churns liquid as it travels along the glass or ceramic, drawing in oxygen from the air and intensifying artisanal matcha’s delightful aromas. It tastes completely different — vastly better — when it’s swirled versus not swirled.

So swirl your matcha, people! You can’t swirl too much — the more your swirl it, the better it tastes. But you need the right vessel, it’s hard to swirl matcha in a bowl. Our creamers were designed for this very purpose. Whip it up with the frother in the creamer, swirl like a madperson, THEN pour that swirled matcha into your heated bowl or cup.

Eric is the founder and chief matcha evangelist at Breakaway Matcha. He's also an author, ghostwriter, editor, cooking instructor, and private chef. For 16 years, he lived and worked in Japan, where he took deep dives into all things matcha, food, literature, arts, and culture. Eric is the author of three cookbooks: The Breakaway Cook, The breakaway Japanese Kitchen, and Eric's Kitchen. He lives and works in Marin County, CA.