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Green tea, white tea, and Pelargonium purpureum increase the antioxidant capacity of plasma and some organs in mice

Green tea, white tea, and Pelargonium purpureum increase the antioxidant capacity of plasma and some organs in mice

Author: Antonios E. Koutelidakis and Konstantina Argiri and Mauro Serafini and Charalambos Proestos and Michael Komaitis and Monia Pecorari and Maria Kapsokefalou

Objective We tested in mice the hypothesis that ingestion of infusions of green tea, white tea, or the aromatic plant Pelargonium purpureum increases total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of plasma and organs. Methods Twenty-five mice were randomly assigned to five groups, each of which received by gavage 0.1 mL of infusion from green tea, white tea, or P. purpureum (8 g/100 mL of water) or catechin (0.01 g/100 mL) or water for 5 consecutive days. On the fifth day the animals were euthanized. Blood was taken by heart puncture and the heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, and brain were removed. TAC was measured in plasma and in all organ homogenates with the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay and in selected organ homogenates by the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter assay. Results Green tea and P. purpureum increased TAC in the plasma and lungs, whereas green tea, white tea, and catechin increased TAC in heart homogenates. No effect was observed on the liver, brain, spleen, and kidney homogenates in comparison with the water control with the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay or the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter assay. Conclusion These results suggest that green tea, white tea, and P. purpureum exhibit antioxidant effects in vivo that may be observed not only in plasma but also in some organs.

 

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