Free, Same Day Shipping (U.S. Only) | Our Breakaway Guarantee

Green tea minimally affects biomarkers of inflammation in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome

Green tea minimally affects biomarkers of inflammation in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome

Author: Arpita Basu and Mei Du and Karah Sanchez and Misti J. Leyva and Nancy M. Betts and Steve Blevins and Mingyuan Wu and Christopher E. Aston and Timothy J. Lyons

Objective Green tea (Camellia sinensis) has shown to exert cardioprotective benefits in observational studies. The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the effects of green tea on features of metabolic syndrome and inflammation in obese subjects. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. Thirty-five subjects [(mean ± SE) age 42.5 ± 1.7 y, body mass index 36.1 ± 1.3 kg/m2] completed the 8-wk study and were randomly assigned to receive green tea (4 cups/d), green tea extract (2 capsules and 4 cups water/d), or no treatment (4 cups water/d). Both the beverage and extract groups had similar dosing of epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the active green tea polyphenol. Fasting blood samples were collected at screening, 4 and 8 wk of the study. Results Green tea beverage or extract supplementation did not significantly alter features of metabolic syndrome or biomarkers of inflammation including adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, leptin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio. However, both green tea beverage and extracts significantly reduced plasma serum amyloid alpha versus no treatment (P < 0.005). Conclusion This study suggests that the daily consumption of green tea beverage or extracts for 8 wk was well tolerated but did not affect the features of metabolic syndrome. However, green tea significantly reduced plasma serum amyloid alpha, an independent cardiovascular disease risk factor, in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome.

 

Get the whole article here