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Green tea constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits angiogenic differentiation of human endothelial cells

Green tea constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits angiogenic differentiation of human endothelial cells

Author: Anoop K Singh and Pankaj Seth and Peter Anthony and Mirza M Husain and Subhashree Madhavan and Hasan Mukhtar and Radha K Maheshwari

Several independent research studies have shown that consumption of green tea reduces the development of cancer in many animal models. Epidemiological observations, though inconclusive, are suggesting that green tea consumption may also reduce the risk of some cancers in humans. These anti-carcinogenic effects of green tea have been attributed to its constituent polyphenols. Angiogenesis is a crucial step in the growth and metastasis of cancers. We have investigated the effect of the major polyphenolic constituent of green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on matrigel. Tube formation was inhibited by treatment both prior to plating and after plating endothelial cells on matrigel. EGCG treatment also was found to reduce the migration of endothelial cells in matrigel plug model. The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) has been shown to play an important role during angiogenesis. Zymography was performed to determine if EGCG had any effect on MMPs. Zymographs of EGCG-treated culture supernatants modulated the gelatinolytic activities of secreted proteinases indicating that EGCG may be exerting its inhibitory effect by regulating proteinases. These findings suggest that EGCG acts as an angiogenesis inhibitor by modulating protease activity during endothelial morphogenesis.

 

 

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