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847 EFFECT OF COFFEE AND GREEN TEA CONSUMPTION ON LIVER ENZYME AND METABOLIC SYNDROME IN KOREAN POPULATION

847 EFFECT OF COFFEE AND GREEN TEA CONSUMPTION ON LIVER ENZYME AND METABOLIC SYNDROME IN KOREAN POPULATION

Author: D.W. Jun and E.K. Kim and H.S. Choi and Y.I. Kown and W. Sohn and O.W. Kwon and K.N. Lee and H.L. Lee and O.Y. Lee and B.C. Yoon and T.Y. Kim and J.H. Sohn

Background: There are several epidemiologic studies that coffee and tea consumption could lower serum liver enzyme activity, and inhibit the progression of liver disease in high-risk subjects. However, many conflicting results have been also reported according to type of coffee and whether the use of filters. Most studies were base on specific cohort group and there are few general population base studies. This study examined on population based study whether coffee has a protective effect when consumed in moderate quantities in metabolic syndrome and liver inflammation. Methods: We used cross-sectional data on coffee, tea consumption frequency, and metabolic parameters of 5,283 adults, aged 20 years and older, who participated in the third Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). We examined the relationship between coffee, tea, and caffeine intake and metabolic parameters using linear regression. Additionally, we examined the relationship with liver enzyme activity using logistic regression. Intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Result: In our study, more than 90% subjects intake instant coffee mix (mix with confectioners’ sugar, powdered creamer, and soluble coffee). Total calorie intake and body mass index were higher in individuals with coffee intake >2 cups daily compared with those with no coffee use (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.021, respectively). However, a gradual increase in the frequency of coffee consumption was associated with stepwise decrease in prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and abnormal fating glucose, which was independent of total calorie, and BMI. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was strikingly decreased from 48.8%, 46.5%, to 40.9% according to the quartile of coffee consumption (p = 0.01, p for trend <0.001). After adjusting for other covariates, the differences remained significant. But frequency of coffee consumption did not affect the liver enzyme activity on general population and high risk group. In cases of normal BMI subjects (23–25 kg/m2), coffee intake had a tendency to increased liver enzyme activity. Frequency of green tea intake did not showed protective effects on liver and metabolic aspects. Conclusion: In this large, national, population-based study, consumption of coffee was associated with lower the risk of metabolic syndrome.

 

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